HGE-3611: The Making of the Atlantic World

University of Namibia

Instructor:
Bernard C. Moore, M.A.
bernardcmoore@gmail.com
+264 (0)81 613 3538

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The Making of the Atlantic World explores the interconnected histories of Africa, Europe, and the Americas, particularly the role of slavery and the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Emphasis is given to economic and cultural transformations occurring between the early 1600s and the early 1900s. We will engage with themes such as pre-colonial slavery in West Africa, the economies of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, reasons for European colonisation of the Americas, enslaved life, the abolition movement, and the rise of contract and indentured labour. We will also address two case studies of trans-Atlantic commodities: Cotton and Sugar. This module will help students understand broader developments in the history of global capitalism and world history, lending insight into modern-day inequalities.

As all History modules should be, this class is reading-intensive. All students are expected to complete the compulsory readings for each week and participate in classroom discussions. The volume of reading necessitates that students plan ahead and avoid delaying the reading assignments for the night before class meetings. Furthermore, the reading list and syllabus is subject to change throughout the term, and students are expected to consult the most up-to-date version from the course website.

ASSIGNMENTS:

Attendance:

Informed classroom attendance and participation is necessary to ensure a quality mark for the end of term. This involves reading and understanding the assigned texts for each week and demonstrating this knowledge through in-class discussion. Merely attending lectures is insufficient for success in this module. Overall, attendance will make up 10% of the final grade. During lecture days, each student is responsible for signing the register with his or her full name in LEGIBLE BLOCK CAPITAL LETTERS, along with his or her student ID number. While minor lateness is inevitable on some days, excessive lateness (both in quantity and duration) is unacceptable and will result in being declared absent. The same applies to excessive absences.

Syllabus Quiz:

During our second week of term, we will be sitting for a short quiz on this syllabus, which is worth 5% of the total value for the term. During the previous week, each student will read the syllabus and study its contents closely. I will be giving a ten question quiz asking simple queries regarding what I expect of my students and what you all can expect of me. I wish to ensure that each of you understand the ways in which you will submit assignments, be graded, and succeed in this class. This should be an easy way for each student to get 5% towards their final mark for the term. Failure to sit for the quiz renders the grade a zero.

Reading Assignment Papers/Questionnaires:

Students must turn in a total of five (5) reading assignment papers/questionnaires, which function as outlines and notes on the week’s readings. Each assignment is worth 1% of the total value of the term, which means all five reading assignments add up to 5% of the total value for the term. These very short assignments are intended to show to me that you have read and thought deeply about the week’s readings. In addition, these assignments help me gauge which aspects of each topic are confusing students, allowing me to modify my lectures as needed so that all students understand the materials. Students must turn in each assignment to me in class (I do not accept emailed copies for these assignments); however, both hand-written and type-written copies are permitted. These assignments are not eligible for the resubmission policy (outlined below), and students may not hand in reading assignment papers for the same week they are submitting supplementary reading analyses. Reading assignment papers must address the compulsory readings, and addressing supplementary readings, while permitted, is not necessary. The blank reading assignment paper form can be found at this [LINK].

Supplementary Reading Summaries/Analyses:

Within each topic, there will be several required readings, and several supplementary readings, each dealing with similar thematic concepts or geographical areas. While all of the required readings are compulsory for all students, the supplementary readings are not always. Each student must sign up to review and analyse THREE supplementary readings and present their findings for ONE of the supplementary readings to the rest of the class in a short (max. 5 minute) presentation.

For the supplementary reading summary/analysis which you present, it is worth 10% of the total value for the term. The 10% is divided into two separately graded assignments, 5% for a minimum two-page type-written essay and 5% for the oral presentation. The minimum two-page essay must not only summarise the empirical or theoretical findings in the article, but also it must relate it to the topic’s compulsory readings. Some queries to be addressed can include (but are not limited to) the following. How does this author’s perspective complement or diverge from our required readings? What new ground does this author try to break with his/her research? Are there major problems or limitations with the author’s research or how he/she presents it (i.e. writing style)? Could consultation with this supplementary reading have improved the analyses of our compulsory readings for the topic? Failure to relate and engage the supplementary reading with at least two of the compulsory readings will result in poor marks. Plagiarism will not be tolerated; summaries and analyses must be in your own words with adequate referencing.

While the Oral Presentation is necessarily shorter than the essays, it should still address a few of the points the author makes, as well as your analysis on the subject. Basically, your job is to try to convince the rest of the class to read the supplementary text you were assigned (even though they don’t have to). Failure to adequately deliver the oral presentation on the assigned date (excepting documented illness, of course) renders their grade for that portion a zero.

For the TWO remaining supplementary reading summaries/analyses, you are only required to write the minimum two-page type-written papers. They must, however, conform to the same standards as the two which you wrote and presented to the class.

On the first day of term, we will choose (first by volunteer, then assignment) who will cover each supplementary reading, and which will be presented orally as well. Be sure to prepare adequately for each paper and presentation so the you can give your best performance on the assigned date. I will accept draft essays prior to the due dates, but it must be more than 7 days in advance. In total, the summaries/analyses of the supplementary readings make up 20% of the total value for the term, divided into four separately graded 5% segments.

Pop Quizzes on Reading Assignments:

On weeks of my choosing, I will give out a total of FIVE pop-quizzes asking several questions pertaining to the readings for the week. Each quiz will be worth 2% of the total value for the term. This means that pop quizzes as a whole will make up 10% of the total value for the term. Failure to read the assignments ahead of time will render your mark for the quizzes poor, and failure to attend on the date of the quiz (without official documentation) will render your mark a zero.

Online Resource Project:

Each student will write a review essay of one of the assigned online resources, relating the digital materials to the coursework we have covered throughout the semester. Some queries to be addressed can include (but are not limited to) the following. Who designed the web-site and funded the research project? How did their expertise(s) influence the final product? What sort of primary materials (i.e. historical documents and photographs) are archived by this project (if any)? What sort of research or exhibitions could be done with these materials? Is there a possible pedagogical use of this web-site for high school history teaching? Are there problems with the chronology or historical analyses which the resource provides? Are there certain groups left out of the presentation, or are they limited by the resources available to them? How could the particular resource or database be improved in the future? Be sure to engage with the materials we read in class, as well as external readings on topics specific to the online resource subject matter.

Grading for this assignment will be done in three segments. First, each student will provide me with a one page proposal noting the online resource they wish to analyse and review, which course materials might be most relevant for informing the review, and at least two academic journal articles specific to the subject matter the online resource is depicting. This segment of the project is worth 2% of the total value for the term. Second, upon acceptance of the proposal, each student will provide me with a three page or more type-written review of the online resource, with adequate citations and references to the published works they consult. I will accept draft papers for commentary, but only if it more more than 10 days prior to the final paper deadline. This segment of the project is worth 6% of the total value for the term. Third, upon acceptance of the three page paper, each student will write a one page type-written summary of the review, intended for distribution to the rest of the class via our class website. As there naturally will be more than one student covering each specific online resource, we will have several perspectives on each digital project. This segment of the project is worth 2% of the total value for the term. In total, the Online Resource Project is worth a full 10% of the total value for the term, divided into three, separately graded segments. Please note in our term calendar below the required submission dates, and please abide by them.

Final Examination:

The policies of the University of Namibia stipulate that I must conclude the class with a final examination, worth 40% of the total value for the term. A mark of 40% or greater on this exam is necessary to pass the class at the end of the term (40% is the sub-minimum), even if the overall mark is higher than 50%. Furthermore, to sit for the final examination, each student must have at least a 40% CA mark throughout the course; this corresponds to 24 points out of 60.

Those who take the final examination and receive an overall term mark between 45% and 49% are permitted to sit for a supplementary examination, from which the highest possible term mark they can receive being a 50%. Those who missed the ordinary final examination and provide a documentation of illness may sit for the special examination.

GRADING SCALE:

Your final grade is made up of the following percentages (totalling 100%), outlined in detail above.

Attendance/Participation: 10%
Syllabus Quiz: 5%
Reading Assignment Questionnaires: 5% (5 x 1% each)
Supplementary Reading Analysis #1 10% (5% paper + 5% presentation)
Supplementary Reading Analysis #2: 5%
Supplementary Reading Analysis #3: 5%
Pop Quizzes on Reading Assignments: 10% (5 x 2% each)
Online Resource Project: 10% (2% proposal, 6% paper, 2% summary)
Final Examination: 40%

SUBMISSION POLICY

My submission policy is quite flexible and generous. I firmly believe that the goal of university education is knowledge transmission and exposing students to new ideas, perspectives, and ways of thinking about the world around them. I do not believe that the goal of university education is to blindly enforce due-dates and schedules; these are meant to be flexible, based on my (and your) specific circumstances week-by-week. I therefore only loosely enforce the due-dates for submission-based assignments. My goal is to receive quality work when it is quality, rather than lousy work that is on-time. I do not want my students to rush to complete an assignment solely because he or she sees a due-date on the syllabus. This results in a lousy academic submission, and more work for me and for you. I do, however, recognise that due-dates enable a degree of planning and consistency throughout the term time, and I encourage students to send in assignments by the due-date for that reason. I do not, however, immediately punish students for late submission.

I prefer to work on a reward-basis. Those students who hand in assignments on or before the due-date are allowed one resubmission after commentary by me, with eligibility for full credit on the assignment. Those who do not submit by the stipulated due-date are not eligible for this resubmission and cannot alter the grade they receive. There is a caveat, however. I do not allow resubmission on assignments receiving less than 60% of the possible grade they could receive. This is to encourage quality submissions, rather than on-time submissions without adequate preparation.

Allow me to provide an example. If a student’s supplementary reading analysis is due on 3 March, and she submits it on or prior to that date, she is eligible for a resubmission if the grade for the assignment is a 3 points out of 5 or better. If she were to receive a 2 out of 5, she would be ineligible for this resubmission. I try to get back assignments with commentary within one week of submission, and the student then is granted two additional weeks (unless stated otherwise) to resubmit (after receiving her commentary from me). Upon resubmission, the grade is final. If resubmission is not made, or the changes to the text did not adequately improve the quality of the work, the grade will remain the same as the first submission. Resubmission cannot lower your original mark.

The resubmission policy is for submission-based work only; those who do not adequately prepare for their oral presentations are unable to perform at a later date and must accept the mark they receive. Oral presentations and class participation are for the benefit of all students and must be done on-time to ensure that all can benefit from the student’s expertise.

The resubmission policy does apply to the Online Resource Project, but the final examination naturally must be taken on the assigned date, not at any other time. Those who do not submit the assignment by the due date have three weeks (unless stated otherwise) to give it to me to avoid receiving a guaranteed zero mark for the assignment. So all assignments (submission or resubmission) must be delivered in full for the final mark within three weeks of the original due date.

Submissions must be type-written and handed to me in class or sent in PDF format only to my email (bernardcmoore@gmail.com). Each paper (and email) must contain the student’s full name, student ID number, assignment title & submission date, and the text. Papers must be written in 12pt Times New Roman font, single-spaced. Margins must not exceed 1 inch (2.5 cm). If you are analysing a supplementary reading, please give the full citation before you begin your text. I recognise that computers fail us sometimes, and I will accept one (legible) hand-written assignment (this does not apply to the Online Resource Paper, which must be typed).

ONLINE RESOURCES:

The Abolition of the Slave Trade. http://abolition.nypl.org/home/
Black New Yorkers. https://www.lapiduscenter.org/black-new-yorkers/
Lest We Forget: The Triumph Over Slavery. http://digital.nypl.org/lwf
The Liberated Africans Project. http://www.liberatedafricans.org/index.html
Slave Biographies: The Atlantic Database Network. http://slavebiographies.org/
Slave Societies Digital Archive. https://www.vanderbilt.edu/esss/
Texas Slavery Project. http://www.texasslaveryproject.org
Voyages: The Transatlantic Slave Trade Database. http://www.slavevoyages.org/

CITATION AND PLAGIARISM POLICY:

Plagiarism is unacceptable and will result in a zero grade for the assignment and disciplinary action. References to published works and online resources necessitate adequate footnote citations (Chicago-style formatting). Verbatim referencing is naturally allowed, though not in excess, and it necessitates citation and quotation marks as dictated by the Department’s Citation Policy. For further information, consult Section Six of the UNAM History Study Guide (LINK). For more information about how to perform Chicago-style citations in papers, please visit www.chicagomanualofstyle.org .

CALENDAR OF TOPICS

First Day: Introduction and Overview

-No Readings Assigned

Week One: Conceptualising the Atlantic World and the Atlantic “Plantation Complex” [SLIDES]

Compulsory Reading 1:

Mintz, Sidney. Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History (London: Penguin, 1985). [LINK]
   -Introduction (pp xv-xxx) -Skim
   -Chapter One: Food, Sociality, and Sugar (pp. 3-18) -Skim
   -Chapter Two: Production (pp. 19-73)
   -Chapter Three: Consumption (pp. 74-150) -Skim pp. 74-107, -Read pp. 108-150
   -Chapter Four: Power (pp. 151-186)
   -Chapter Five: Eating & Being (p. 187-214) -Skim

Compulsory Reading 2:

Curtin, Philip D. The Rise and Fall of the Plantation Complex: Essays in Atlantic History (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990). [LINK]
   -Chapter One: The Mediterranean Origins (pp. 3-16)
   -Chapter Two: Sugar Planting: From Cyprus to the Atlantic Islands (pp.17-28)

Supplementary Reading:

Fatah-Black, Karwan. “Paramaribo as a Dutch and Atlantic Nodal Point, 1650-1795.” in Dutch Atlantic Connections, 1680-1800: Linking Empires, Bridging Borders, edited by Gert Oostindie & Jessica V. Roitman (Leiden: Brill, 2014): 52-71. [LINK] [201602395, Paper & Presentation]

Supplementary Reading:

Kimball, Eric. “’What Have We to do with Slavery?’ New Englanders and the Slave Economies of the West Indies.” in Slavery’s Capitalism: A New History of American Economic Development, edited by Sven Beckert and Seth Rockman (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016): 181-194. [LINK] [201603106, Paper & Presentation]

Supplementary Reading:

Beckert, Sven, and Seth Rockman. “Introduction: Slavery’s Capitalism.” in Slavery’s Capitalism: A New History of American Economic Development, edited by Sven Beckert and Seth Rockman (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016): 1-27. [LINK] [201039974, Paper & Presentation]

Supplementary Reading:

Sidbury, James. “Globalization, Creolization, and the Not-so-Peculiar Institution.” The Journal of Southern History 73, no. 3 (2007): 617-630. [LINK] [201706663, Paper & Presentation]

Week Two: Slavery in Africa (Part One) [SLIDES]

Class is cancelled for 14 February, Syllabus Quiz and presentations are rescheduled for Monday, 19 February!

Compulsory Reading 1:

Lovejoy, Paul E. Transformations in Slavery: A History of Slavery in Africa (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012). [LINK]
   -Prefaces (pp. xiii-xxiv)
   -Chapter One: Africa & Slavery (pp. 1-23)
   -Chapter Two: On the Frontiers of Islam (pp. 24-44)

Compulsory Reading 2:

Stilwell, Sean. Slavery and Slaving in African History (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014). [LINK]
   -Chapter One: Defining Slavery, Defining Freedom (pp. 1-28)
   -Chapter Two: Slavery in African History (pp. 29-59)

Compulsory Reading 3:

Curtin, Philip D. The Rise and Fall of the Plantation Complex: Essays in Atlantic History (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990). [LINK]
   -Chapter Three: Africa and the Slave Trade (pp. 29-45)

Supplementary Reading:

Miers, Suzanne. “Slavery: A Question of Definition.” Slavery and Abolition 24 (2003): 1-16. [LINK] [201705992, Paper & Presentation] [201403149, Paper] [201709939, Paper]

Supplementary Reading:

Ojo, Olatunji. “Child Slaves in Pre-colonial Nigeria, c.1725–1860.” Slavery and Abolition 33, no. 3 (2012): 417-434. [LINK] [201603938, Paper & Presentation] [201705578, Paper] [201604497, Paper]

Week Three: Slavery in Africa (Part Two): The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade [SLIDES]

Papers and Presentations for Week Two Due Tuesday February 20

Compulsory Reading 1:

Stilwell, Sean. Slavery and Slaving in African History (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014). [LINK]
   -Chapter Two: Slavery in African History (pp. 29-59)

Compulsory Reading 2:

Lovejoy, Paul E. Transformations in Slavery: A History of Slavery in Africa (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012). [LINK]
   -Chapter Three: The Export Trade in Slaves (pp. 45-65)
   -Chapter Four: The Enslavement of Africans (pp. 66-87)
   -Chapter Five: The Organisation of Slave Marketing (pp. 88-107) -Skim
   -Chapter Seven: The Nineteenth Century Slave Trade (pp. 135-159) – Skim
   -Chapter Eight: Slavery and ‘Legitimate Trade’ on the West African Coast (pp. 160-184)

Supplementary Reading:

Candido, Mariana P. “Different Slave Journeys: Enslaved African Seamen on Board of Portuguese Ships, c.1760–1820s.” Slavery and Abolition 31, no. 3 (2010): 395-409. [LINK] [201602649, Paper & Presentation] [201715551, Paper]

Supplementary Reading:

Hawthorne, Walter. “Gorge: An African Seaman and his Flights from ‘Freedom’ back to ‘Slavery’ in the Early Nineteenth Century.” Slavery and Abolition 31, no. 3 (2010): 411-428. [LINK] [201605818, Paper & Presentation] [201509549, Paper]

Supplementary Reading:

Oriji, J.N. “A Re-assessment of the Organisation and Benefits of the Slave and Palm Produce Trade Amongst the Ngwa—Igbo.” Canadian Journal of African Studies 16, no. 3 (1982): 523-548. [LINK] [201612755, Paper & Presentation] [201602519, Paper]

Week Four: Slavery in Africa (Part 3): The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade (continued) [SLIDES]

Papers and Presentations for Week Three Due Tuesday February 27

Compulsory Reading 1:

Smallwood, Stephanie E. Saltwater Slavery: A Middle Passage from Africa to African Diaspora (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2007). [LINK]
   -Introduction (pp. 1-8)
   -Chapter Two: Turning African Captives into Atlantic Commodities (skim pp. 33-52) (read pp. 52-64).
   -Chapter Three: The Political Economy of the Slave Ship (skim pp. 66-100)
   -Chapter Four: The Anomalous Intimacies of the Slave Cargo (read pp. 118-121)
   -Chapter Five: The Living Dead about the Slave Ship at Sea (Skim pp. 126-135)
   -Chapter Six: Turning Atlantic Commodities into American Slaves (skim)

Compulsory Reading 2:

Gomez, Michael A. Reversing Sail: A History of the African Diaspora (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005). [LINK]
   -Chapter Four: Transatlantic Movement (pp. 59-81)

Supplementary Reading:

Gewald, Jan-Bart. “Untapped Sources: Slave Exports from Southern and Central Namibia up to c. 1850.” in The Mfecane Aftermath: Reconstructive Debates in Southern African History, edited by Carolyn Hamilton (Johannesburg: Witwatersrand University Press, 1995): 417-435. [LINK] [201709107, Paper & Presentation] [201709068, Paper & Presentation] [201603938, Paper] [201705016, Paper] [201712789, Paper] [201711554, Paper] [201710187, Paper]

Supplementary Reading:

Fatah-Black, Karwan, and Matthias van Rossum. “Beyond Profitability: The Dutch Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade and its Economic Impacts.” Slavery and Abolition 36, no. 1 (2015): 63-83. [LINK] [201509549, Paper & Presentation]  [201709943, Paper & Presentation] [201603106, Paper] [201704966, Paper] [201403558, Paper]

Supplementary Reading:

Thornton, John. “The Slave Trade in Eighteenth Century Angola: Effects on Demographic Structures.” Canadian Journal of African Studies 14, no. 3 (1980): 417-427. [LINK] [201506440, Paper & Presentation] [201710187, Paper & Presentation] [201506085, Paper] [201613341, Paper] [201710784, Paper]

Supplementary Reading:

Gonzalez, Jorge Felipe. “Prize Negroes in Cape Town and the Atlantic Abolitionism.” Southern African Digital History Journal (2015). [LINK] [201602519, Paper & Presentation] [201612755, Paper] [201602455, Paper] [201710166, Paper] [200711121, Paper] [201408015, Paper]

Week Five: Enslaved Life (Part One): Overview [SLIDES]

Papers and Presentations for Week Four Due Tuesday March 6

Compulsory Reading 1:

Gomez, Michael A. Reversing Sail: A History of the African Diaspora (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005). [LINK]
   -Chapter Five: Enslavement (pp. 82-108)

Compulsory Reading 2:

Curtin, Philip D. The Rise and Fall of the Plantation Complex: Essays in Atlantic History (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990). [LINK]
   -Chapter Four: Capitalism, Feudalism, and Sugar Planting in Brazil (pp. 46-57)
   -Chapter Five: Bureaucrats and Free Lances in Spanish America (pp. 58-70)
   -Chapter Six: The Sugar Revolution and the Settlement of the Caribbean (pp. 71-85)
   -Chapter Eight: Slave Societies on the Periphery (pp. 98-110)

Compulsory Reading 3:

Revisit Sidney Mintz, Sweetness and Power in light of readings you have completed since. [LINK]

Supplementary Reading:

Groenewald, Gerald. “Slaves and Free Blacks in VOC Cape Town, 1652-1795.” History Compass 8, no. 9 (2010): 964-983. [LINK[201715551, Paper & Presentation] [201604507, Paper & Presentation] [201506440, Paper] [201605185, Paper] [201408015, Paper]

Supplementary Reading:

Handler, Jerome S. and Matthew C. Reilly. “Contesting “White Slavery” in the Caribbean Enslaved Africans and European Indentured Servants in Seventeenth-Century Barbados.” New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids 91 (2017): 30-55. [LINK[201506085, Paper & Presentation] [201605818, Paper] [201602519, Paper] [201503106, Paper]

Supplementary Reading:

Ramey, Daina L. “She Do a Heap of Work”: Female Slave Labor on Glynn County Rice and Cotton Plantations.” The Georgia Historical Quarterly 82, no. 4 (1998): 707-734. [LINK[201609262, Paper & Presentation] [201601947, Paper & Presentation] [201603938, Paper] [201711666, Paper]

Week Six: Enslaved Life (Part Two): The Birth of African Diasporic Identity [SLIDES]

Papers and Presentations for Week Five Due Tuesday March 13

Compulsory Reading 1:

Gomez, Michael A. Exchanging Our Country Marks: The Transformation of African Identities in the Colonial and Antebellum South (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998). [LINK]
   -Chapter One: Vesey’s Challenge (pp. 1-16)
   -Chapter Two: Time and Space (pp. 17-37)
   -Chapter Three: Warriors, Charms, and Loas: Senegambia and the Bight of Benin (skim pp. 38-58)
   -Chapter Four: “Prayin’ on duh Bead”: Islam in Early America (pp. 59-87)
   -Chapter Five: Societies and Stools: Sierra Leone and the Akan (skim pp. 88-113)
   -Chapter Six: “I seen Folks Disappeah”: The Igbo and West Central Africa (read pp. 114-134. Skim 135-153)
   -Chapter Seven: Talking Half African: Middle Passage, Seasoning, and Language (pp. 154-185)
   -Chapter Eight: Tad’s Query: Ethnicity and Class in African America (pp. 186-244)
   -Chapter Nine: Turning Down the Pot: Christianity and the African-based Community (pp.244-290)

Compulsory Reading 2:

Smallwood, Stephanie E. Saltwater Slavery: A Middle Passage from Africa to African Diaspora (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2007). [LINK]
   -Chapter Seven: Life and Death in Diaspora (read pp. 182-207)

Supplementary Reading:

O’Toole, Rachel Sarah. “As Historical Subjects: The African Diaspora in Colonial Latin American History.” History Compass 11, no. 12 (2013): 1094-1110. [LINK] [201710166, Paper & Presentation] [201709107, Paper] [201612755, Paper] [201705016, Paper] [201606072, Paper]

Supplementary Reading:

Carney, Judith A. Black Rice: The African Origins of Rice Cultivation in the Americas (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2001). [LINK] [201403149, Paper & Presentation] [201703956, Paper & Presentation] [201605818, Paper] [201704966, Paper] [201610123, Paper] [201601947, Paper]
   -Chapter Five: African Rice and the Atlantic World (pp. 142-159)
   -Chapter Six: Legacies (pp. 160-178).

Supplementary Reading:

Lovejoy, Paul E. “’Freedom Narratives’ of Trans-Atlantic Slavery.” Slavery and Abolition 32, no. 1 (2011): 91-107. [LINK] [201604497, Paper & Presentation] [201710784, Paper & Presentation] [201609262, Paper] [201711554, Paper] [201613341, Paper]

Week Seven: Slave Resistance, Slave Revolts and “Democratic Revolutions” [SLIDES]

IN-CLASS ACTIVITY: “X-TREME ENDNOTES!!!”
Papers and Presentations for Week Six Due Tuesday March 20
Proposal for Online Resource Project Due Tuesday March 20

Compulsory Reading 1:

Curtin, Philip D. The Rise and Fall of the Plantation Complex: Essays in Atlantic History (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990). [LINK]
   -Chapter Eleven: The Democratic Revolution in the Atlantic Basin (pp. 144-157)
   -Chapter Twelve: Revolution in the French Antilles (pp. 158-172)

Compulsory Reading 2:

Gomez, Michael A. Reversing Sail: A History of the African Diaspora (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005). [LINK]
   -Chapter Six: Asserting the Right to Be (pp. 109-161)

Compulsory Reading 3:

Fanning, Sarah C. “The Roots of Early Black Nationalism: Northern African Americans’ Invocations of Haiti in the Early Nineteenth Century.” Slavery & Abolition 28, no. 1 (2007): 61-85. [LINK]

Supplementary Reading:

Oostindie, Gert. “Slave Resistance, Colour Lines, and the Impact of the French and Haitian Revolutions in Curaçao.” in Curaçao in the Age of Revolutions, 1795-1800, edited by Wim Klooster and Gert Oostindie (Leiden: KITLV, 2011), 1-22. [LINK[201709939, Paper & Presentation] [201506085, Paper] [201039974, Paper] [201508948, Paper] [201602520, Paper]

Supplementary Reading:

Taber, Robert D. “Navigating Haiti’s History: Saint-Domingue and the Haitian Revolution.” History Compass 13, no. 5 (2015): 235-250. [LINK[201705578, Paper & Presentation] [201503106, Paper] [201602455, Paper] [201705323, Paper]

Supplementary Reading:

Handler, Jerome S. “Escaping Slavery in a Caribbean Plantation Society: Marronage in Barbados, 1650-1830s.” New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids 71, no. 3/4 (1997): 183-225. [LINK[201606072, Paper & Presentation] [201613341, Paper & Presentation] [201710166, Paper] [201604507, Paper]

Supplementary Reading:

Bell, Richard. “Slave Suicide, Abolition, and the Problem of Resistance.” Slavery and Abolition 33, no. 4 (2012): 525-549. [LINK[201711666, Paper & Presentation] [201403558, Paper & Presentation] [201715551, Paper] [201503241, Paper]

Week Eight: The Abolitionist Movement and the End of the Slave Trade [SLIDES]

Papers and Presentations for Week Seven Due Wednesday April 4 (Post-Break)

Compulsory Reading 1:

Stilwell, Sean. Slavery and Slaving in African History (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014). [LINK]
   -Chapter Six: The End of Slavery in Africa (pp. 176-214)

Compulsory Reading 2:

Curtin, Philip D. The Rise and Fall of the Plantation Complex: Essays in Atlantic History (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990). [LINK]
   -Chapter Thirteen: Readjustments in the Nineteenth Century (pp. 173-188)
   -Chapter Fourteen: The End of Slavery in the Americas (pp. 189-203)

Compulsory Reading 3:

Lovejoy, Paul E. Transformations in Slavery: A History of Slavery in Africa (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012). [LINK]
   -Chapter Eight: Slavery and ‘Legitimate Trade’ on the West African Coast (pp. 160-184) -skim
   -Chapter Eleven: The Abolitionist Impulse (pp. 244-266)

Compulsory Reading 4:

Seeley, Samantha. “Beyond the American Colonization Society.” History Compass 14, no. 3 (2016): 93-104. [LINK]

Supplementary Reading:

McDaniel, W. Caleb. “His Brothers’ Keeper: John Brown, Moral Stewardship and Interracial Abolitionism.” Slavery and Abolition 32, no. 1 (2011): 27-52. [LINK] [201712789, Paper & Presentation] [201602395, Paper] [201605185, Paper] [201403558, Paper]

Supplementary Reading:

Røge, Pernille. “Why the Danes Got There First – A Trans-Imperial Study of the Abolition of the Danish Slave Trade in 1792.” Slavery and Abolition 35, no. 4 (2014): 576-592. [LINK] [, Paper & Presentation]  [201705323, Paper & Presentation] [201706663, Paper]

Supplementary Reading:

Harries, Patrick. “Negotiating Abolition: Cape Town and the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade.” Slavery and Abolition 34, no. 4 (2013): 579-597. [LINK] [201704989, Paper & Presentation] [201704440, Paper & Presentation] [201609262, Paper] 

Supplementary Reading:

Robins, Jonathan E. “Slave Cocoa and Red Rubber: E.D. Morel and the Problem of Ethical Consumption.” Comparative Studies in Society and History 54, no. 3 (2012): 592-611. [LINK] [201602455, Paper & Presentation] [200711121, Paper & Presentation] [201704779, Paper] [201604507, Paper]

Week Nine: Legacies of Slavery and the Slave Trade [SLIDES]

Papers and Presentations for Week Eight Due Tuesday April 10

Compulsory Reading 1:

Lovejoy, Paul E. Transformations in Slavery: A History of Slavery in Africa (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012). [LINK]
   -Chapter Twelve: Slavery in the Political Economy of Africa (pp. 267-280)

Compulsory Reading 2:

Rodney, Walter. How Europe Underdeveloped Africa (Washington, D.C.: Howard University Press, 1981). [LINK]
   -Chapter Four: Europe and the Roots of African Underdevelopment to 1885 (pp. 93-146).
   -Chapter Five: Africa’s Contribution to Capitalist Development in Europe (pp. 147-202).

Supplementary Reading:

Oostindie, Gert. “The Slippery Paths of Commemoration and Heritage Tourism: The Netherlands, Ghana, and the Rediscovery of Atlantic Slavery.” New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids 79, no. 1/2 (2005): 55-77. [LINK[201508948, Paper & Presentation] [201602649, Paper] [201602520, Paper] [201709943, Paper]

Supplementary Reading:

Johnson, Walter. “The Pedestal and the Veil: Rethinking the Capitalism/Slavery Question.” Journal of the Early Republic 24, no. 2 (2004): 299-308. [LINK[201706231, Paper & Presentation] [201408015, Paper & Presentation] [201403149, Paper] [201606072, Paper] [201703956, Paper]

Supplementary Reading:

Wilder, Craig Steven. “War and Priests: Catholic Colleges and Slavery in the Age of Revolution.” in Slavery’s Capitalism: A New History of American Economic Development, edited by Sven Beckert and Seth Rockman (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016): 227-242. [LINK[201705016, Paper & Presentation]  [201711554, Paper & Presentation] [201506440, Paper] [201503241, Paper] [201704779, Paper]

Supplementary Reading:

Walters, Ronald W. “The Impact of Slavery on 20th and 21st Century Black Progress.” The Journal of African American History 97, no. 1/2 (2012): 110-130. [LINK[201605185, Paper & Presentation] [201705992, Paper] [201610123, Paper] [201601947, Paper]

Week Ten: The Rise of Indentured and Contract Labour [SLIDES]

Papers and Presentations for Week Nine Due Tuesday April 17
Online Resource Project Paper Due Tuesday April 17

Compulsory Reading 1:

Northrup, David. Indentured Labour in the Age of Imperialism, 1834-1922 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1995). [LINK]
   -Chapter One: Beginnings (pp. 1-15)
   -Chapter Two: Demands (pp. 16-42)
   -Chapter Six: Conclusions (pp. 140-154)

Compulsory Reading 2:

Hoefte, Rosemarijn. “A Passage to Suriname? The Migration of Modes of Resistance by Asian Contract Labourers.” International Labour and Working Class History 54 (1998): 19-39. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 3:

De Koning, Anouk. “Shadows of the Plantation? A Social History of Suriname’s Bauxite Town Moengo.” New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids 85, no. 3/4 (2011): 215-246 [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 4:

Clarence-Smith, William-Gervase. “Labour Conditions in the Plantations of São Tomé and Príncipe, 1875–1914.” Slavery & Abolition 14, no. 1 (1993): 149-167. [LINK]

Supplementary Reading:

Sundiata, Ibrahim K. “Prelude to Scandal: Liberia and Fernando Po, 1880-1930.” Journal of African History 15, no. 1 (1974): 97-112. [LINK[201503241, Paper & Presentation] [201604497, Paper] [201711666, Paper] [201703956, Paper] [201710784, Paper]

Supplementary Reading:

Hu-Dehart, Evelyn. “Chinese Coolie Labour in Cuba in the Nineteenth Century: Free Labour or Neo-Slavery?” Contributions in Black Studies 12 (1994): 38-54. [LINK[201704966, Paper & Presentation] [201705578, Paper] [201705992, Paper] [201704989, Paper] [201709068, Paper] [201705323, Paper]

Supplementary Reading:

Casey, Matthew. “Haitians’ Labour and Leisure on Cuban Sugar Plantations: The Limits of Company Control.” New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids 85, no. 1/2 (2011): 5-30. [LINK[201610123, Paper & Presentation] [201602395, Paper] [201509549, Paper] [201712789, Paper]

Week Eleven: Atlantic World Case Study #1: Cotton [SLIDES]

Papers and Presentations for Week Ten Due Tuesday April 24

Compulsory Reading 1:

Beckert, Sven. “Emancipation and Empire: Reconstructing the Worldwide Web of Cotton Production in the Age of the American Civil War.” American Historical Review 109, no. 5 (2004): 1405-1438. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 2:

Beckert, Sven. “From Tuskegee to Togo: The Problem of Freedom in the Empire of Cotton.” The Journal of American History 92, no. 2 (2005): 498-526. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 3:

Zimmerman, Andrew. Alabama in Africa: Booker T. Washington, the German Empire, and the Globalization of the New South (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010). [LINK]
     -Introduction (pp. 1-19)

Compulsory Reading 4:

Zimmerman, Andrew. “A German Alabama in Africa: The Tuskegee Expedition to Togo and the Transnational Origins of West African Cotton Growers.” American Historical Review 110, no. 5 (2005): 1362-1398. [LINK]

Supplementary Reading:

Gudmestad, Robert. “Technology and the World the Slaves Made.” History Compass 4, no. 2 (2006): 373-383. [LINK[201704779, Paper & Presentation] [201603106, Paper] [201706663, Paper] [201508948, Paper] [201709943, Paper] [201704440, Paper]

Supplementary Reading:

Zimmerman, Andrew. “Cotton Booms, Cotton Busts, and the Civil War in West Africa.” Journal of the Guided Age and the Progressive Era 10, no. 4 (2011): 454-463. [LINK[201503106, Paper & Presentation] [201602649, Paper] [201039974, Paper] [201710187, Paper] [201706231, Paper] [201709068, Paper]

Week Twelve: Atlantic World Case Study #2: Sugar

Papers and Presentations for Week Eleven Due Monday April 30
Online Resource Project Summaries Due Monday April 30

Compulsory Reading 1:

Revisit Mintz, Sweetness and Power [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 2:

Bosma, Ulbe, and Johnathan Curry-Machado. “Two Islands, One Commodity: Cuba, Java, and the Global Sugar Trade, 1970-1930.” New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids 86, no. 3/4 (2012): 237-262. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 3:

Tadman, Michael. “The Demographic Cost of Sugar: Debates on Slave Societies and Natural Increase in the Americas.” American Historical Review 105, no. 5 (2000): 1534-1574. [LINK]

Supplementary Reading:

Stipriaan, Alex. “The Suriname rat race: labour and technology on sugar plantations, 1750-1900.” New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids 63, no. 1/2 (1989): 94-117. [LINK[201602520, Paper & Presentation] [201709939, Paper] [201709107, Paper] [201704989, Paper] [201706231, Paper] [201704440, Paper] [200711121, Paper]

Week Thirteen: Catch-Up and Review.

Papers and Presentations for Week Twelve Due Tuesday May 8

Week Fourteen: Catch-Up and Review.

FINAL EXAMINATION