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HGE-3840: Historiography (Y303)

Instructor:
Bernard C. Moore, M.A.
bmoore@unam.na
bernardcmoore@gmail.com
+264 (0)81 613 3538
Y043 – Consultation Mondays 9:30am-11:25am & 12:30pm-1:00pm
(Or By Appointment)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Historiography is the study of History as an academic discipline, noting changes in methodology, theories, and influences from various sources. HGE-3840 presents students with an overview of developments and transformations in historical thought. Focus will be given to several specific theoretical and methodological themes, namely, empiricism, Marxism, and the Annales school. We will also cover several thematic topics, particularly, economic history, environmental history, and women & gender history. Finally, the term will conclude with two geographical topics, noting transformations and developments in the study of African history and Southern African history, specifically. This class is intended to be introductory, and non-comprehensive.

As many History modules should be, this class is reading-intensive. All students are expected to complete the compulsory readings for each week and participate in classroom discussions. The volume of reading necessitates that students plan ahead and avoid delaying the reading assignments for the night before class meetings. Furthermore, the reading list and syllabus is subject to change throughout the term, and students are expected to consult the most up-to-date version from the course website.

ASSIGNMENTS:

As the historiography course is a full-year module, there is no final examination during the first term. With that being said, your C.A. for this term contributes towards your overall C.A. for the year. The coursework and readings which you prepare this term will make up 50% of your annual C.A. for historiography, as well as make up some of the material for the final exam at the end of the second term. I have calculated the assignments below on a 60 point scale (the ordinary C.A. for a standard term). At the end of the term, I will pass on to your next lecturer your C.A. for this term and he/she will then calculate it into your final mark.

Attendance:

Informed classroom attendance and participation is necessary to ensure a quality mark for the end of term. This involves reading and understanding the assigned texts for each week and demonstrating this knowledge through in-class discussion. Merely attending lectures is insufficient for success in this module. Overall, attendance will make up 15 points out of 60 towards this term’s C.A. During lecture days, each student is responsible for signing the register with his or her full name in LEGIBLE BLOCK CAPITAL LETTERS, along with his or her student ID number. While minor lateness is inevitable on some days, excessive lateness (both in quantity and duration) is unacceptable and will result in being declared absent. The same applies to excessive absences.

Syllabus Quiz:

During our second class meeting, we will be sitting for a short quiz on this syllabus, which is worth 5 points out of 60 towards this term’s C.A. During the previous week, each student will read the syllabus and study its contents closely. I will be giving a ten question quiz asking simple queries regarding what I expect of my students and what you all can expect of me. I wish to ensure that each of you understand the ways in which you will submit assignments, be graded, and succeed in this class. This should be an easy way for each student to get 5 points towards their term C.A. Failure to sit for the quiz renders the grade a zero.

Reading Assignment Papers/Questionnaires:

Students must turn in a total of five (5) reading assignment papers/questionnaires, which function as outlines and notes on the week’s readings. Each assignment is worth 1 point out of 60 towards this term’s C.A., which means all five reading assignments add up to 5 points out of 60 towards this term’s C.A. These very short assignments are intended to show to me that you have read and thought deeply about the week’s readings. In addition, these assignments help me gauge which aspects of each topic are confusing students, allowing me to modify my lectures as needed so that all students understand the materials. Students must turn in each assignment to me in class (I do not accept emailed copies for these assignments); however, both hand-written and type-written copies are permitted. These assignments are not eligible for the resubmission policy (outlined below), and students may not hand in reading assignment papers for the same week they are submitting supplementary reading analyses. Reading assignment papers must address the compulsory readings, and addressing supplementary readings, while permitted, is not necessary. The blank reading assignment paper form can be found at this [LINK].

Supplementary Reading Summaries/Analyses:

Within each topic, there will be several required readings, and several supplementary readings, each dealing with similar thematic concepts or geographical areas. While all of the required readings are compulsory for all students, the supplementary readings are not always. Each student must sign up to review and analyse FIVE supplementary readings and present their findings for TWO of the supplementary readings to the rest of the class in a short (max. 5 minute) presentation.

For the two supplementary reading summaries/analyses which you choose to present, each is worth 10 points out of 60 towards this term’s C.A.. The 10 points is divided into two separately graded assignments, 5 points for a minimum two-page type-written essay and 5 points for the oral presentation. The minimum two-page essay must not only summarise the empirical or theoretical findings in the article, but also it must relate it to the topic’s compulsory readings. Some queries to be addressed can include (but are not limited to) the following. How does this author’s perspective complement or diverge from our required readings? What new ground does this author try to break with his/her research? Are there major problems or limitations with the author’s research or how he/she presents it (i.e. writing style)? Could consultation with this supplementary reading have improved the analyses of our compulsory readings for the topic? Failure to relate and engage the supplementary reading with at least two of the compulsory readings will result in poor marks. Plagiarism will not be tolerated; summaries and analyses must be in your own words with adequate referencing.

While the Oral Presentations are necessarily shorter than the essays, they should still address a few of the points the author makes, as well as your analysis on the subject. Basically, your job is to try to convince the rest of the class to read the supplementary text you were assigned (even though they don’t have to). Failure to adequately deliver the oral presentation on the assigned date (excepting documented illness, of course) renders their grade for that portion a zero.

For the THREE remaining supplementary reading summaries/analyses, you are only required to write the minimum two-page type-written papers. They must, however, conform to the same standards as the two which you wrote and presented to the class.

On the first day of term, we will choose (first by volunteer, then assignment) who will cover each supplementary reading, and which will be presented orally as well. Be sure to prepare adequately for each paper and presentation so the you can give your best performance on the assigned date. I will accept draft essays prior to the due dates, but it must be more than 7 days in advance. In total, the summaries/analyses of the supplementary readings make up 35 points out of 60 towards this term’s C.A., divided into seven separately graded 5 point segments.

Final Examination:

As noted above, there is no final examination held during term one. The material we cover during this term will, however, be on the second term final examination.

GRADING SCALE:

Your term C.A. is made up of the following percentages (totaling 60 points), outlined in detail above.

Attendance/Participation: 15 points
Syllabus Quiz: 5 points
Reading Assignment Questionnaires: 5 points (5 x 1 point each)
Supplementary Reading Analysis #1: 10 points (5 points paper + 5 points presentation)
Supplementary Reading Analysis #2: 10 points (5 points  paper + 5 points presentation)
Supplementary Reading Analysis #3: 5 points
Supplementary Reading Analysis #4: 5 points
Supplementary Reading Analysis #5: 5 points

SUBMISSION POLICY

My submission policy is quite flexible and generous. I firmly believe that the goal of university education is knowledge transmission and exposing students to new ideas, perspectives, and ways of thinking about the world around them. I do not believe that the goal of university education is to blindly enforce due-dates and schedules; these are meant to be flexible, based on my (and your) specific circumstances week-by-week. I therefore only loosely enforce the due-dates for submission-based assignments. My goal is to receive quality work when it is quality, rather than lousy work that is on-time. I do not want my students to rush to complete an assignment solely because he or she sees a due-date on the syllabus. This results in a lousy academic submission, and more work for me and for you. I do, however, recognise that due-dates enable a degree of planning and consistency throughout the term time, and I encourage students to send in assignments by the due-date for that reason. I do not, however, immediately punish students for late submission.

I prefer to work on a reward-basis. Those students who hand in assignments on or before the due-date are allowed one resubmission after commentary by me, with eligibility for full credit on the assignment. Those who do not submit by the stipulated due-date are not eligible for this resubmission and cannot alter the grade they receive. There is a caveat, however. I do not allow resubmission on assignments receiving less than 60% of the possible grade they could receive. This is to encourage quality submissions, rather than on-time submissions without adequate preparation.

Allow me to provide an example. If a student’s supplementary reading analysis is due on 3 March, and she submits it on or prior to that date, she is eligible for a resubmission if the grade for the assignment is a 3 points out of 5 or better. If she were to receive a 2 out of 5, she would be ineligible for this resubmission. I try to get back assignments with commentary within one week of submission, and the student then is granted two additional weeks (unless stated otherwise) to resubmit (after receiving her commentary from me). Upon resubmission, the grade is final. If resubmission is not made, or the changes to the text did not adequately improve the quality of the work, the grade will remain the same as the first submission. Resubmission cannot lower your original mark.

The resubmission policy is for submission-based work only; those who do not adequately prepare for their oral presentations are unable to perform at a later date and must accept the mark they receive. Oral presentations and class participation are for the benefit of all students and must be done on-time to ensure that all can benefit from the student’s expertise.

Those who do not submit the assignment by the due date have three weeks (unless stated otherwise) to give it to me to avoid receiving a guaranteed zero mark for the assignment. So all assignments (submission or resubmission) must be delivered in full for the final mark within three weeks of the original due date. The resubmission policy does not apply to the final examination, which naturally must be taken on the assigned date, not at any other time.

Submissions must be type-written and handed to me in class or sent in PDF format only to my email (bernardcmoore@gmail.com). Each paper (and email) must contain the student’s full name, student ID number, assignment title & submission date, and the text. Papers must be written in 12pt Times New Roman font, single-spaced. Margins must not exceed 1 inch (2.5 cm). If you are analysing a supplementary reading, please give the full citation before you begin your text. I recognise that computers fail us sometimes, and I will accept one (legible) hand-written assignment.

CITATION AND PLAGIARISM POLICY:

Plagiarism is unacceptable and will result in a zero grade for the assignment and disciplinary action. References to published works and online resources necessitate adequate footnote citations (Chicago-style formatting). Verbatim referencing is naturally allowed, though not in excess, and it necessitates citation and quotation marks as dictated by the Department’s Citation Policy. For further information, consult Section Six of the UNAM History Study Guide [LINK]. For more information about how to perform Chicago-style citations in papers, please visit www.chicagomanualofstyle.org .

A FEW THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT YOUR INSTRUCTOR:

I am currently pursuing my PhD in History at the School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London. I have been working in the field of Namibian History (Economic & Environmental) since 2012, and this naturally influences how I teach my courses and choose my materials. I am currently conducting research at the National Archives of Namibia and in the Hardap & //Karas regions. For this region, there may be some rescheduling and cancelling of class meetings, which must be done by me with at least four days in advance, via e-mail communication to the students. Students are therefore expected to check their e-mail accounts regularly.

I suffer from ongoing hearing loss, which is better on some days than others. Therefore, I request that students speak loudly and clearly during class meetings, so that I can hear each person’s valuable contribution to the lessons. Please do not be insulted if I ask you to repeat yourself, even if it is several times. I find that this solution is better than mishearing comments and perspectives.

COURSE OUTLINE:

First Day: Introduction and Overview

-No Readings Assigned

Week One: Transformations in Western Historiography: Overview, and Empiricism [SLIDES]

Compulsory Reading 1: Sewell Jr., William H. Logics of History: Social Theory and Social Transformation (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005). Chapter Two: “The Political Unconscious of Social and Cultural History, or, Confessions of a Former Quantitative Historian.” [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 2: Green, Anna & Kathleen Troup. Houses of History: A Critical Reader in Twentieth Century History and Theory (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1999). Chapter One: “The Empiricists.” pp 1-11. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 3: Davies, Stephen. Empiricism and History (New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2003). Chapter One: “The Creation of Empirical History” pp 10-24. and Chapter Two: “The Perfection of Empirical History,” pp. 25-42. [LINK]

Week Two: Marxian Theory & Case Study (Primitive Accumulation) [SLIDES]

Class is cancelled for 14 February, Syllabus Quiz is rescheduled for Monday, 19 February!

Background: Read Wikipedia entry for “Labour Power” [Marx’s most influential contribution to Political Economy] [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 1: Perelman, Michael. The Invention of Capitalism: Classical Political Economy and the Secret of Primitive Accumulation (Durham: Duke University Press, 2000). Chapters One & Two, pp. 13-37. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 2: Marx, Karl. Capital: A Critique of Political Economy, Volume One. (New York: Penguin, [1867]). Part VII: “The So-Called Primitive Accumulation” pp. 704-764. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 3: Harvey, David. A Companion to Marx’s Capital, Volume One. (London: Verso, 2010). Introduction, pp. 1-14. and Chapter Eleven: “The Secret of Primitive Accumulation” pp. 289-314. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 4: Donham, Donald. “Mode of Production,” in The International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioural Sciences, edited by N.J. Smelser & P.B. Bates (Oxford: Elsevier, 2001): 9924- 9927. [LINK]

Supplementary Reading: Perelman, Michael. The Invention of Capitalism: Classical Political Economy and the Secret of Primitive Accumulation (Durham: Duke University Press, 2000). Chapter Three: “Primitive Accumulation and the Game Laws” pp. 38-58. [LINK] [201091542, Paper & Presentation]

Supplementary Reading: Forstater, Matthew. “Taxation and Primitive Accumulation – The Case of Colonial Africa.” Research in Political Economy 22 (2005): 51-65. [LINK] [201206006, Paper & Presentation]

Week Three: Marxian Historiography [SLIDES]

Papers and Presentations for Week Two Due Wednesday February 21

Compulsory Reading 1: Rigby, S.H. “Marxist Historiography,” in Companion to Historiography, edited by Michael Bentley (London: Routledge, 1997): 868-906. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 2: Lambert, Peter & Philip Schofield (eds.). Making History: An Introduction to the History and Practices of a Discipline (London: Routledge, 2004). Chapter Twelve: Philip Schofield, “History and Marxism.” pp. 180-191. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 3: Thompson, E.P. “Time, Work-Discipline, and Industrial Capitalism.” Past & Present 38 (1967), 56-97. [LINK]

Supplementary Reading: Schenk, Timothy. “Thomas Piketty and Millennial Marxists on the Scourge of Inequality.” The Nation (14 April, 2014) [LINK]. and Lotz, Christian. “Is Capital a Thing? Remarks on Piketty’s Concept of Capital.” Critical Sociology 41 no. 2 (2015): 375-383. [LINK] [201505130, Paper & Presentation] [201304512, Paper & Presentation]

Week Four: The Annales School [SLIDES]

Papers and Presentations for Week Three Due Monday February 26

Compulsory Reading 1: Huppert, George. “The Annales Experiment.” in Companion to Historiography, edited by Michael Bentley (London: Routledge, 1997): 853-867. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 2: Hunt, Lynn. “French History in the Last Twenty Years: The Rise and Fall of the Annales Paradigm.” Journal of Contemporary History 21, no. 2 (1986): 209-224. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 3: Wesseling, H.L. “The Annales School and the Writing of Contemporary History.” Review 1, no. 3/4 (1978): 185-194. [LINK]

Supplementary Reading: Goldfrank, Walter F. “Paradigm Regained? The Rules Of Wallerstein’s World-System Method.” Journal of World Systems Research 11, no. 2 (2000): 150-195. [LINK] [201310905, Paper & Presentation] [201107163, Paper & Presentation]

Week Five: Economic History & the History of Capitalism [SLIDES]

Papers and Presentations for Week Four Due Monday March 5

Compulsory Reading 1: Hilt, Eric. “Economic History, Historical Analysis, and the ‘New History of Capitalism.’” Journal of Economic History 77, no. 2 (2017): 511-536. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 2: Lipartito, Kenneth. “Reassembling the Economic: New Departures in Historical Materialism.” American Historical Review 121, no. 1 (2016): 101-139. [LINK]

Supplementary Reading: Johnson, Walter. “The Pedestal and the Veil: Rethinking the Capitalism/Slavery Question.” Journal of the Early Republic 24, no. 2 (2004): 299-308. [LINK] [200409417, Paper & Presentation] [201208804, Paper & Presentation] [201507429, Paper] [201210363, Paper] [201118629, Paper] [201091542, Paper] [201100173, Paper]

Supplementary Reading: van der Linden, Marcel. “The Promise and Challenges of Global Labour History.” International Labour and Working Class History 82 (2012): 57-76. [LINK] [201100568, Paper & Presentation] [201506088, Paper & Presentation] [201103423, Paper] [21208933, Paper] [201304512, Paper

Supplementary Reading: Jerven, Morten et. al. “Moving Forward in African Economic History: Bridging the Gap Between Methods and Sources.” African Economic History Network: Working Paper Series, no. 1 (2012). [LINK] [201508765, Paper & Presentation] [201104394, Paper & Presentation] [201101221, Paper]

Week Six: Environmental History

Papers and Presentations for Week Five Due Monday March 12

Compulsory Reading 1: Isenberg, Andrew C. “Introduction: A New Environmental History.” in The Oxford Handbook of Environmental History, edited by Andrew C. Isenberg (New York: Oxford University Press, 2014): 1-20. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 2: Myllyntaus, Timo. “Environment in Explaining History: Restoring Humans as Part of Nature.” in Encountering the Past in Nature: Essays in Environmental History, edited by Timo Myllyntaus & Mikko Saikku (Athens: Ohio University Press, 1999), 141-160. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 3: Stoll, Steven. “A Metabolism of Society: Capitalism for Environmental Historians.” in The Oxford Handbook of Environmental History, edited by Andrew C. Isenberg (New York: Oxford University Press, 2014): 369-397. [LINK]

Supplementary Reading: McKittrick, Meredith. “Industrial Agriculture.” in A Companion to Global Environmental History, edited by J.R. McNeill & Erin Stewart Maudlin (New York: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012): 411-432. [LINK] [201503029, Paper & Presentation] [201300007, Paper & Presentation] [201104394, Paper]  [201087677, Paper] [201101221, Paper] [201507451, Paper]

Supplementary Reading: Isenberg, Andrew C. “Seas of Grass: Grasslands in World Environmental History.” in The Oxford Handbook of Environmental History, edited by Andrew C. Isenberg (New York: Oxford University Press, 2014): 133-153. [LINK] [201307238, Paper & Presentation] [201129663, Paper & Presentation]

Supplementary Reading: Boyd, William. The Slain Wood: Papermaking and its Environmental Consequences in the American South (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2015). Preface, pp. ix-xiii. and Introduction, pp. 1-15. [LINK] [201507429, Paper & Presentation] [201107163, Paper] [201087677, Paper & Presentation] [200409417, Paper] [201206006, Paper] [201507451, Paper] [201091542, Paper] [201100173, Paper] [201303432, Paper]

Supplementary Reading: Nance, Susan. The Historical Animal (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2015). Introduction pp. 1-18 [LINK]. and Swart, Sandra. “Writing Animals into African History.” Critical African Studies 8, no. 2 (2016): 95-108. [LINK] [201118629, Paper & Presentation] [201101221, Paper & Presentation] [201507451, Paper] [201504431, Paper]

Supplementary Reading: Worster, Donald. The Wealth of Nature: Environmental History and the Ecological Imagination (New York: Oxford University Press, 1993). Chapter Three: “History as Natural History” pp. 30-44. [LINK] [201504431, Paper & Presentation] [200615572, Paper & Presentation] [201091542, Paper] [201304512, Paper]

Week Seven: Women & Gender History [SLIDES]

Papers and Presentations for Week Six Due Monday March 19

IN-CLASS ACTIVITY: “X-TREME ENDNOTES!!!”

Compulsory Reading 1: Hufton, Olwen. “Women, Gender, and the Fin de Siècle.” in Companion to Historiography, edited by Michael Bentley (London: Routledge, 1997): 907-917. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 2: White, Luise. The Comforts of Home: Prostitution in Colonial Nairobi (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1990). Introduction: “Prostitution in Comparative Perspective” pp. 1-28. and Chapter Nine: “Women, Wage Labour, and the Limits of Colonial Control” pp. 221-228. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 3: Achebe, Nwando. “Nwando Achebe–Daughter, Wife, and Guest–A Researcher at the Crossroads.” Journal of Women’s History 14, no. 3 (2002): 9-31. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 4: Epprecht, Marc. “The Making of “African Sexuality”: Early Sources, Current Debates.” History Compass 8, no. 8 (2010): 768-779. [LINK]

Supplementary Reading: Achebe, Nwando. “Twenty-Five Years of African Women Writing African Women’s and Gendered Worlds.” Journal of Women’s History 25, no. 4 (2013): 275-287. [LINK]  [201501961, Paper & Presentation] [201103423, Paper & Presentation] [201104394, Paper] [201507429, Paper] [201307238, Paper] [201101221, Paper] [201206006, Paper] [201310905, Paper] [200615572, Paper]

Supplementary Reading: Dauphin, Cécile et. al. “Women’s Culture and Women’s Power: An Attempt at Historiography.” Journal of Women’s History 1, no. 1 (1989): 63-88. [LINK] [201300007, Paper & Presentation] [201003694, Paper & Presentation] [201401490, Paper] [201103423, Paper] [201210363, Paper] [201100173, Paper] [201504431, Paper]

Supplementary Reading: Doan, Lauren. “Queer History/Queer Memory: The Case of Alan Turing.” GLQ: A Journal of Gay and Lesbian Studies 23, no. 1 (2017): 113-136. [LINK] [201104394, Paper & Presentation] [201129663, Paper & Presentation] [201501743, Paper] [201504431, Paper]

Supplementary Reading: Tallie, T.J. “Racialised Masculinity and the Limits of Settlement: John Dunn and Natal, 1879-1883.” Journal of Natal and Zulu History 30 (2012): 1-22. [LINK] [201506088, Paper & Presentation] [201208933, Paper & Presentation]

Supplementary Reading: Tallie, T.J. “Queering Natal: Settler Logics and the Disruptive Challenge of Zulu Polygamy.” GLQ: A Journal of Gay and Lesbian Studies 19, no. 2 (2013): 167-189. [LINK] [201087677, Paper & Presentation] [201107163, Paper & Presentation] [201505130, Paper]

Week Eight: African Historiography (Part One): Overview [SLIDES]

Papers and Presentations for Week Seven Due Wednesday April 4 (Because of holiday, we will meet during our Wednesday time slot)

Compulsory Reading 1: Fage, J.D. “The Development of African Historiography.” in UNESCO General History of Africa, Vol. 1, edited by Joseph Ki-Zerbo (Paris: UNESCO, 1989): 25-42. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 2: Curtin, Philip D. “Recent Trends in African Historiography and their Contribution to History in General.” in UNESCO General History of Africa, Vol. 1, edited by Joseph Ki-Zerbo (Paris: UNESCO, 1989): 54-71. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 3: Feierman, Steven. “Africa in History: The End of Universal Narratives.” in After Colonialism: Imperial Histories and Postcolonial Displacements, edited by Gyan Prakash (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995): 40-65. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 4: Reid, Richard. “Past and Presentism: The ‘Pre-Colonial’ and the Foreshortening of African History.” Journal of African History 52 (2011): 135-155. [LINK]

Supplementary Reading: Vansina, Jan. “UNESCO and African Historiography.” History in Africa 20 (1993): 337-352. [LINK] [201304512, Paper & Presentation] [201101221, Paper & Presentation] [201508765, Paper] [201100568, Paper] [201003694, Paper] [201303432, Paper]

Supplementary Reading: Eriksen, Tore Linné. “Modern African History: Some Historiographical Observations.” Scandinavian Journal of History 4 (1979): 75-97. [LINK] [201003694, Paper & Presentation] [200615572, Paper & Presentation] [201501743, Paper] [201303432, Paper]

Week Nine: African Historiography (Part Two): Oral History, “National History” [SLIDES]

Papers and Presentations for Week Eight Due Monday April 9

Compulsory Reading 1: Vansina, Jan. “Oral Tradition and its Methodology.” in UNESCO General History of Africa, Vol. 1, edited by Joseph Ki-Zerbo (Paris: UNESCO, 1989): 142-165. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 2: Vansina, Jan. “For Oral Tradition (But Not Against Braudel).” History in Africa 5 (1978): 351-356. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 3: Hadfield, Leslie Anne. “Can We Believe the Stories about Biko? Oral Sources, Meaning, and Emotion in South African Struggle History.” History in Africa 42 (2015): 239-263. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 4: Reid, Richard. “States of Anxiety: History and Nation in Modern Africa.” Past & Present 229, no. 1 (2015): 239-269. [LINK]

Supplementary Reading: Austen, Ralph A. “Africa & Globalisation: Colonialism, Decolonisation, and Post- Colonial Malaise.” Journal of Global History 1, no. 3 (2006): 403-408. [LINK] [201208933, Paper & Presentation] [201104394, Paper] [201507429, Paper] [201307238, Paper] [201210363, Paper] [200409417, Paper] [201118629, Paper] [201310905, Paper] [201208804, Paper] [200615572, Paper] [201505130, Paper]

Supplementary Reading: Lindsay, Lisa. “Biography in African History.” History in Africa 44 (2017): 11-26. [LINK] [201208933, Paper & Presentation] [201401490, Paper & Presentation]. [201103423, Paper]

Supplementary Reading: Ellis, Stephen. “Africa’s Wars of Liberation: Some Historiographical Reflections.” in Trajectoires de libération en Afrique contemporaine: Hommage à Robert Buijtenhuijs (Leiden: Afrika Studiecentrum, 2000): 69-91. [LINK] [201206006, Paper & Presentation] [201208804, Paper & Presentation] [201087677, Paper]

Week Ten: African Historiography (Part Three): The “Archive” [SLIDES]

Papers and Presentations for Week Nine Due Monday April 16

Compulsory Reading 1: Bernault, Florence. “Suitcases and the Poetics of Oddities: Writing History from Disorderly Archives.” History in Africa 42 (2015): 269-277. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 2: White, Luise. “Hodgepodge Historiography: Documents, Itineraries, and the Absence of Archives.” History in Africa 42 (2015): 309-318. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 3: Straussberger, John. “Fractures and Fragments: Finding Postcolonial Histories of Guinea in Local Archives.” History in Africa 42 (2015): 299-307. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 4: Ally, Shireen. “Material Remains – Artifice versus Artefact(s) in the Archive of Bantustan Rule.” Journal of Southern African Studies 41, no. 5 (2015): 969-989. [LINK]

Supplementary Reading: Harris, Verne. “’They should have destroyed more:’ The Destruction of Public Records by the South African State in the Final Years of Apartheid, 1990-1994.” Paper presented at the Wits History Workshop: The TRC; Commissioning the Past, 11-14 June, 1999. [LINK] [201091542, Paper & Presentation] [201501961, Paper & Presentation] [201506088, Paper] [201401490, Paper] [201508765, Paper] [21208933, Paper] [201100568, Paper] [201206006, Paper] [201310905, Paper] [201003694, Paper] [201208804, Paper] [201505130, Paper]

Supplementary Reading: Anderson, David M. “Mau Mau in the High Court and the ‘Lost’ British Empire Archives: Colonial Conspiracy or Bureaucratic Bungle?” Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History 39, no. 5 (2011): 699-716. [LINK] [201505130, Paper & Presentation] [201103423, Paper & Presentation] [201506088, Paper] [201107163, Paper]

Supplementary Reading: Namhila, Ellen Ndeshi. “Content and Use of Colonial Archives: An Under- Researched Issue.” Archival Science 16 (2016): 111-123. [LINK] [201310905, Paper & Presentation] [201501743, Paper & Presentation] [201506088, Paper] [201307238, Paper] [201107163, Paper] [201508765, Paper] [201100568, Paper] [200409417, Paper] [201003694, Paper] [201208804, Paper]

Supplementary Reading: Breckenridge, Keith. “The Politics of a Parallel Archive: Digital Imperialism and the Future of Record-Keeping in the Age of Digital Reproduction.” Journal of Southern African Studies 40, no. 3 (2014): 499-519. [LINK]. [201100173, Paper & Presentation] [201210363, Paper & Presentation]

Week Eleven: South African Historiography (Part One) [SLIDES]

Papers and Presentations for Week Ten Due Monday April 23

Compulsory Reading 1: Saunders, Christopher. The Making of the South African Past: Major Historians on Race and Class (Cape Town: David Philip, 1988). Chapter Sixteen: “The Challenge Begins”, and Chapter Seventeen: “Class, Race, Structure, and Process.” [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 2: Deborah Posel, “Social History and the Wits History Workshop,” African Studies 69, no. 1 (2010): 29-40. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 3: Peter Delius, “E.P. Thompson, ‘Social History’, and South African Historiography,” Journal of African History 58, no. 1 (2017): 3-17. [LINK]

Supplementary Reading: Saunders, Christopher. “Historians and the South African Truth Commission.” History Compass 2, no. 1 (2004): 1-3. [LINK] and watch Harris, Verne. “Unfinished Business: The Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Memory, and Archives in South Africa.” Lecture delivered at Michigan State University, 2006. [LINK] [200409417, Paper & Presentation] [201118629, Paper & Presentation] [201118629, Paper]

Supplementary Reading: Grundlingh, Albert. “Sosiale Geskiedenis en die Dilemma Afrikanergeskiedskrywing.” South African Historical Journal 19, no. 1 (1987): 31-49. [LINK] or Read the English Version of the Article (not an exact translation, but similar arguments are made. [LINK] [201100568, Paper & Presentation] [201507451, Paper & Presentation]

Supplementary Reading: Limb, Peter. “Terence Ranger, African Studies and South African Historiography.” Historia 56, no. 1 (2011): 1-25. [LINK] [201508765, Paper & Presentation] [201401490, Paper & Presentation] [201303432, Paper & Presentation]

Supplementary Reading: Dubow, Saul. “New Approaches to High Apartheid and Anti-Apartheid.” South African Historical Journal 69, no. 2 (2017): 304-329. [LINK].  [201100173, Paper & Presentation] [201210363, Paper & Presentation] [200615572, Paper]

Week Twelve: South African Historiography (Part Two): Case Study: Capitalism [NOTES]

Papers and Presentations for Week Eleven Due Monday April 30

Compulsory Reading 1: Wolpe, Harold. “Capitalism and Cheap Labour Power in South Africa: From Segregation to Apartheid,” Economy and Society 1, no. 4 (1972): 425-456. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 2: Bozzoli, Belinda. “Marxism, Feminism, and South African Studies,” Journal of Southern African Studies 9, no. 2 (1983): 139-171. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 3: Beinart, William, & Peter Delius, “Introduction,” in Putting a Plough to the Ground: Accumulation and Dispossession in Rural South Africa, edited by William Beinart, Peter Delius & Stanley Trapido (Johannesburg: Ravan Press, 1986): 1-55. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 4: Morris, Mike. “Social History and the Transition to Capitalism in the South African Countryside,” Review of African Political Economy 41 (1988): 60-72. [LINK]

Supplementary Reading: Jacobs, Nancy J. “Latitudes and Longitudes: Comparative Perspectives on Cape Environmental History,” Kronos 29 (2003), 7-29. [LINK] [201503029, Paper & Presentation] [201501743, Paper & Presentation] [201503029, Paper] [21208933, Paper] [201501961, Paper]

Supplementary Reading: [DEBATE] van Sittert, Lance. “The Nature of Power: Cape Environmental History, The History of Ideas, and Neoliberal Historiography,” Journal of African History 45 (2004), 305-313. and Beinart, William. “Academic Amnesia and the Poverty of Polemics,” Journal of African History 46 (2005), 127-134. van Sittert, Lance. “Reply,” Journal of African History 46 (2005), 135-137. [LINK] [201307238, Paper & Presentation] [201504431, Paper & Presentation] [201503029, Paper] [201501961, Paper]

Supplementary Reading: Maylam, Paul. “Explaining the Apartheid City: 20 Years of South African Urban Historiography.” Journal of Southern African Studies 21, no. 1 (1995): 19-38. [LINK] [201507429, Paper & Presentation] [201507451, Paper & Presentation] [201303432, Paper & Presentation] [201401490, Paper] [201087677, Paper] [201503029, Paper] [201501961, Paper] [201501743, Paper] [201304512, Paper]

Week Thirteen: Catch-Up and Review.

Papers and Presentations for Week Twelve Due Monday May 5

Week Fourteen: Catch-Up and Review.


Term Two:

Week One – Review and Re-Reading of the Following Topics from Term One:

Transformations in Western Historiography: Overview, and Empiricism

Marxian Theory & Marxian Historiography

The Annales School

Week Two – Review and Re-Reading of the Following Topics from Term One:

Economic History & the History of Capitalism

Environmental History

Women & Gender History

Week Three – Review and Re-Reading of the Following Topics from Term One:

African Historiography

South African Historiography

Week Four – Namibian History/Historiography (Part One):

Compulsory Reading 1: Wallace, Marion. A History of Namibia: From the Beginning to 1990 (New York: Columbia University Press, 2011). Read pages 1-130. (Introduction and Chapters 1-4). [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 2: Lau, Brigitte. “‘Thank God the Germans Came’: Vedder and Namibian Historiography.” in History and Historiography: Four Essays in Reprint (Windhoek: MSORP, 1995): 1-16 [LINK]

Week Five – Namibian History/Historiography (Part Two):

Compulsory Reading 1: Wallace, Marion. A History of Namibia: From the Beginning to 1990 (New York: Columbia University Press, 2011). Read pages 131-204. (Chapters 5-7). [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 2: Lau, Brigitte. “Uncertain Certainties: The Herero-German War of 1904,” in History & Historiography: Four Essays in Reprint, 39-52. Windhoek: MSORP, 1995. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 3: Hillebrecht, Werner. “Certain Uncertainties: Or Venturing Progressively into Colonial Apologetics” Journal of Namibian Studies 1 (2007), 73-96. [LINK]

Week Six – Namibian History/Historiography (Part Three):

Compulsory Reading 1: Dedering, Tilman. “The German-Herero War of 1904: Revisionism of Genocide or Imaginary Historiography?” Journal of Southern African Studies 19, no. 1 (1993),  80-88. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 2: Eckl, Andreas. “The Herero Genocide of 1904: Source-Critical and Methodological Considerations.” Journal of Namibian Studies 3 (2008), 31-61. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 3: Kundrus, Birthe. “Continuities, parallels, receptions: Reflections on the ‘colonization’ of National Socialism.” Journal of Namibian Studies 4 (2008), 25-46. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 4: Zollmann, Jakob. “From Windhuk to Auschwitz – old wine in new bottles? Review article.” Journal of Namibian Studies 14 (2013), 77-121. [LINK]

Week Seven – Namibian History/Historiography (Part Four):

Compulsory Reading 1: Wallace, Marion. A History of Namibia: From the Beginning to 1990 (New York: Columbia University Press, 2011). Read pages 205-316. (Chapters 8, 9, 10, & Conclusion). [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 2: Akawa, Martha. The Gender Politics of the Namibian Liberation Struggle. (Basel: Basler Afrika Bibliographien, 2014). Read Introduction (pp.  1-28) and Chapter 1 (pp. 29-65) [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 3: Baines, Gary. “Conflicting Memories, Competing Narratives and Complicating Histories – Revisiting the Cassinga Controversy” Journal of Namibian Studies 6 (2009), 7-26. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 4: Zuern, Elke. “Memorial Politics: Challenging the Dominant Party’s Narrative in Namibia.” Journal of Modern African Studies 50, 3 (2012), 493-518. [LINK]

Week Eight – Alternative Source Use: Photographs and Posters

Compulsory Reading 1:  Hartmann, Wolfram, Jeremy Silvester & Patricia Hayes. The Colonising Camera: Photographs in the Making of Namibian History (Cape Town: UCT Press, 1998) [LINK].

Chapter Two: ‘This Ideal Conquest’: Photography and Colonialism in Namibian History (pp. 10-19)

Chapter Seven: Looking at the Locations: The Ambiguities of Urban Photography (pp. 132-137).

Chapter Thirteen: Northern Exposures: The Photography of C.H.L. Hahn, Native Commissioner of Ovamboland, 1915-1946 (pp. 171-186)

Compulsory Reading 2: Erichsen, Casper. “Shoot to Kill: Photographic Images in the Namibian Liberation Bush War.” Kronos 27 (2001): 158-182. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 3: Miescher, Giorgio, Lorena Rizzo, Jeremy Silvester. “Visualizing Namibia: Posters and Publics before Independence.” Critical Interventions 2 (2008): 102-124. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 4: Rizzo, Lorena. “A Glance into the Camera: Gendered Visions of Historical Photographs in Kaoko (North-Western Namibia).” Gender & History 17, no. 3 (2005): 682-713. [LINK]

Week Nine – Alternative Source Use: Church Records and Maps

Compulsory Reading 1:  Siiskonen, Harri, Anssi Taskinen, Veijo Notkola. “Parish Registers: a Challenge for African Historical Demography.” History in Africa 32 (2005): 385-402 [LINK].

Compulsory Reading 2: McKittrick, Meredith. “Making Rain, Making Maps: Competing Geographies of Water and Power in Southwestern Africa.” Journal of African History 58, no. 2 (2017): 187-212. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 3: Kokkonen, Pellervo. “Religious and Colonial Realities: Cartography of the Finnish Mission in Ovamboland, Namibia.” History in Africa 20 (1993): 155-171 [LINK]

Week Ten – Alternative Source Use: Plants and Animals

Compulsory Reading 1:  Lenggenhager, Luregn. “Nature, War and Development – South Africa’s Caprivi Strip, 1960–1980.” Journal of Southern African Studies 41, no. 3 (2015): 467-483. [LINK].

Compulsory Reading 2: Siiskonen, Harri. “Deforestation in the Owambo Region, North Namibia, Since the 1850s.” Environment & History 2, no. 3 (1996): 291-308. [LINK]

Compulsory Reading 3: Moore, Bernard. “Fenced Out: Labour Reductions and Vermin Definitions in Southern Namibia.” Draft Paper (2017). [LINK]

Week Eleven, Twelve, Thirteen – Synthesis: Group Discussions

What does our study of different branches of historical thought, different focuses of historical research, and different uses of historical sources mean for archival science and historical practice? What other kinds of sources can we use to represent historical change? How does changing access to historical resources alter the way in which we both write history and understand historical change? How can advances in historical research alter public debate on historical issues?